My Dog is marking in the house

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Why has my dog suddenly marking in the house when he didn’t do it before?

Usually it is because of feelings of insecurity or a perceived threat. This perceived threat, for example, can be an introduction of a new baby, a new pet, a visitor or even a new piece of furniture. The smell of other animals on your footwear or clothing can also trigger a dog to feel the need to mark his territory.

For example, a son or daughter goes to college. This cause the loss of sounds, smells, and people, as well as changes in routine. Your dog may not be getting as much attention as previously. Changes cause him to feel anxious, which may cause him to mark.

Some dogs feel the need to lift their leg and pee on all new things that enter your house, shopping bags, visitor’s belongings, new furniture, children’s toys etc. Many of these dogs are lacking in confidence and training, so by marking new objects it makes them feel more secure having deposited their own scent on these objects.

Some dogs will never mark in their own house but will embarrass you by marking if you visit a friend or relative’s home. Your dog feels less secure there and feels the need to make it more comfortable to him by laying down a few of his own familiar scents.

How to stop your dog marking urine in the house

Neuter: For pet dogs, early neutering will stop marking behavior in the majority of dogs. Neutering at an early age can prevent the habit forming.

For older dogs, neutering may still have the desired effect but marking in the house may have become a habit that you will have to break.  It can’t be guaranteed that neutering a dog is going to magically cure this problem but if you don’t neuter a male dog, your chances of breaking the habit are greatly reduced. 

Supervise and Break the Habit: Catch him in the act! DOGS LEARN QUICKLY FROM THIS!

Close supervision is necessary. You must be dedicated to stop the marking behavior of your dog and you must be consistent. A couple of weeks or often much less time of intense supervision and correction can save you a lifetime of tearing your hair out trying to find a quick fix for the problem. Some people have reported that it has only taken a day or two using the intense supervision method.

Confine your dog to one area of the house where you can watch him. Shut doors to other areas of the house or barricade them off with baby gates or improvise with whatever is at hand.

If barricading is not possible another option is to put your dog on a retractable lead while he is in the house with you and for you to have total control at all times.